All

Popular

Opinion: Failing to address millennial concerns could cost Democrats the election

When boomers, mostly in legacy media, write articles about millennials, they often sound as if they’re explaining petulant teenagers.

Millennials are not teens; they now range in age from 22 to 40. And while many of them are struggling to carve out a place for themselves in a workforce their boomer parents have been reluctant to leave, they are also deciders, emergent masterminds and power brokers of politics and the economy. They’re often the ones green-lighting your creative content, rejecting your budget or setting the political conversation based on their analytics.

Read original

All

Top Rated

All

Latest

Opinion: Failing to address millennial concerns could cost Democrats the election

When boomers, mostly in legacy media, write articles about millennials, they often sound as if they’re explaining petulant teenagers.

Millennials are not teens; they now range in age from 22 to 40. And while many of them are struggling to carve out a place for themselves in a workforce their boomer parents have been reluctant to leave, they are also deciders, emergent masterminds and power brokers of politics and the economy. They’re often the ones green-lighting your creative content, rejecting your budget or setting the political conversation based on their analytics.

Read original

Opinion: Failing to address millennial concerns could cost Democrats the election

When boomers, mostly in legacy media, write articles about millennials, they often sound as if they’re explaining petulant teenagers.

Millennials are not teens; they now range in age from 22 to 40. And while many of them are struggling to carve out a place for themselves in a workforce their boomer parents have been reluctant to leave, they are also deciders, emergent masterminds and power brokers of politics and the economy. They’re often the ones green-lighting your creative content, rejecting your budget or setting the political conversation based on their analytics.

Read original

Read More

Opinion: 50 years ago today, L.A.’s Black Panthers became targets of the world’s first major SWAT raid

In the early morning hours of Dec. 8, 1969, Bernard Arafat awoke to explosions rocking the library of the Black Panthers’ 41st and Central Avenue headquarters in Los Angeles. Above him, footsteps stomped across the roof. Then gunfire erupted.

Arafat wasn’t a seasoned Panther. He was a 17-year-old runaway from juvenile hall whose parents had both died when he was 13. After years of committing small-time crimes, Arafat was taken in by the Panthers and gained a sense of purpose.

Read original

Read More

Britain’s Election Stakes

Britons head to the polls Thursday for their most consequential general election since the 1970s. As with the 1979 vote that brought Margaret Thatcher to power, the outcome will shape Britain for a generation.

First and foremost, this is a Brexit election. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is campaigning to restore democratic legitimacy after Parliament has spent three years trying to thwart voters’ 2016 decision to leave the European Union.

Read original

Read More

Let Bosnia’s Scars Be a Reminder

The most dangerous concert you didn’t attend happened 25 years ago this Saturday. The venue was a small community center in Sarajevo, Bosnia, a city under siege from 1992-96 during the Yugoslav Wars. Serbs controlled the hills that surround most of the city. United Nations peacekeeping troops controlled the airport and did, well, not much. And yes, this was the conflict during which Hillary Clinton falsely remembered “landing under sniper fire.”

Someone from the U.N.

Read original

Read More

Mayor Pete’s Retirement Plan to Tax the Middle Class

Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg claimed last month that “everything that we have proposed has been paid for, and we have proposed no tax increase on the middle class.” The South Bend, Ind., mayor is incorrect on both counts: He hasn’t said how he’d pay for all his proposed spending. He has endorsed one explicit tax increase on the middle class, and his recent retirement plan provides an outline for another. Add it up, and middle-class workers could face a trillion dollars in new taxes.

Read original

Read More
Loading

Recent Comments