Author: Froma Harrop

Not Much Romance in Santa’s Toy Warehouse for 12/05/2019

A fixture of family Christmas movies is worldly-wise children recovering some of their innocence. “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) provides an early example.

The new animated film “Klaus” (on Netflix) does not stray from this theme. Children living on an icy island seek a workaround to their toyless Christmas, the work of mean, greedy adults. But one children’s fantasy remains: that the toys would come from a shop in the woods run by a Santa Claus figure named Klaus.

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Warren’s Problems Go Beyond Health Care for 12/03/2019

Elizabeth Warren had great momentum for a while. Then her poll numbers leveled and fell. The standard explanation is that the Democrat’s “Medicare for All” plan comes across as too radical — both the price and the part that would force over 150 million Americans off their employers’ private coverage.

But other negatives subtract from Warren’s appeal as a presidential candidate. One is that she grates on us, another way of saying not likable. The other is she’s not totally honest.

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Astoundingly, the Republican Attack Machine Targets the Military for 11/28/2019

The focus here isn’t President Donald Trump. He is a creature unto himself. Rather, this is about his spineless political party, which stands mute, or even supportive, as he breaks U.S. military discipline, morale and leadership.

The GOP used to be the party of superpatriots, always saluting our men and women in uniform. It still playacts.

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The Zen of Thanksgiving for 11/26/2019

Editor’s Note: The following is a revised version of a column first published in November 2002.

Thanksgiving is the most American of holidays. But there is something almost un-American about it. It is a day opposed to striving, to getting more. We stop adding up the numbers on the scorecard of life. We freeze in place and give thanks for whatever is there.

The Wall Street Journal once featured sob stories about failed dot-com entrepreneurs. People still in their 20s and 30s spoke painfully of their disappointments.

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