Category: LA Times

Opinion: What slavery can teach Supreme Court justices about DACA

The Morgan children were in their pajamas, probably dreaming, when four men broke into their home before daylight, loaded them into the back of an open wagon and forcibly took them across Pennsylvania’s southern border. The year was 1837.

The men were working with a slave catcher named Edward Prigg who had come for their mother, Margaret, claiming she was an escaped slave belonging to a woman named Margaret Ashmore, who lived in Harford County, Md. The children had never been slaves. At least one was born on the free soil of York County, Pa.

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Opinion: Donating money to help your child get into college isn’t wrong

The wealthy parents ensnared in the college admissions scandal violated the law in numerous ways. They falsified standardized test scores, fabricated athletic profiles and disguised payments for admissions consulting as tax-deductible charitable contributions.

But the prosecutors’ recent addition of bribery charges in some of the cases promotes the erroneous view that family financial contributions have no place in the admissions process.

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Opinion: California is making the writing life even harder

I never thought the State of California would make it even harder for writers to make a living, but here we are.

To be fair, that’s not the Legislature’s intention. Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez (D-San Diego) drafted Assembly Bill 5 to help workers victimized by the gig economy. She consulted with writers’ organizations regarding its effect on writers. She deserves a lot of credit for her efforts. But even before AB 5 takes effect on Jan. 1, 2020, the marketplace is making it unworkable for many freelancers.

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Editorial: Regardless of what the Supreme Court does, Congress should make DACA stronger, and permanent

Predicting how the U.S. Supreme Court will decide a case based on the questions the justices raise during oral arguments is a fraught endeavor, but the tenor of those exchanges Tuesday morning did not bode well for supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., a potential swing vote, at times Read original

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Editorial: Veterans are still homeless in Los Angeles. They shouldn’t be

There are 3,878 veterans who lack a “fixed, regular or adequate place to sleep” on any given night in Los Angeles County, according to the annual count of the homeless conducted in January. Like the rest of L.A. County’s homeless population, most of them live on streets and sidewalks while a smaller number find beds in shelters. About a dozen live in an encampment outside the gates of the VA’s campus in West L.A.

But although there was a grim rise in the overall number of homeless people in L.A.

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Imagine if we put the same effort into housing homeless Angelenos as we do Olympic athletes

In the summer of 2028, hundreds of thousands of athletes, support staff and tourists will flood into Los Angeles for the 34th Olympiad, all needing a roof over their heads immediately. Within hours, they will all find one.

Meanwhile, nearly 60,000 men, women and children continue to languish on L.A. sidewalks, underpasses, in cars and crowded shelters, their numbers growing every year — and our leaders say it will take years to find them shelter.

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Opinion: Why Jimmy Hoffa still casts a long shadow over labor

On a summer afternoon in 1975, the most notorious labor leader in the United States disappeared, the presumed victim of a mob hit. Today, the case remains unsolved, Hoffa’s body has never been found, and his story continues to fascinate the public. Martin Scorsese’s new film, “The Irishman,” about a mob hitman who claims to have killed Hoffa, is only the most recent in a long line of film and TV productions about the one labor leader most Americans have ever heard of.

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