Category: LA Times

Editorial: Is California’s presidential primary a disaster waiting to happen?

California lawmakers moved the state’s 2020 presidential primary up to March 3 to give voters in the most populous state more influence over who will be running in the November general election. But millions of voters might be left out anyway unless they pay close attention to the rules for crossover voting and take action soon.

Voting in California has changed a lot in the last decade.

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Opinion: What Jewish and black people owe each other

Every January, synagogues across the country hold a special service or ceremony in memory of Martin Luther King Jr. They do this to honor the great man who inspired America to be better, and to honor the special black-Jewish bond so significant to the civil rights era.

Reason No. 1 is more than appropriate; reason No. 2 is a bit complicated.

Many American Jews romanticize what “we” did for “them” during the civil rights era. These Jews resent what they see as a lack of African American support for Jewish causes, including Israel.

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Opinion: Lesson from Tunisia: Curb coastal erosion — stop building along Southern California beaches

After I returned from a long and demanding scientific expedition in the coastal areas of North Africa, my colleague took me for a walk on Corona del Mar State Beach. A few steps in, he started recalling 15-year-old memories of the beach and how it has changed since. The beach seemed to be disappearing because of sea level rise, he said.

Many people make that observation, but from research I helped conduct off the coast of Tunisia, I knew the reason was probably more complicated than that.

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Op-Ed: I donated my kidney to a stranger — and more of us should

For most of my life, I’ve been a model of good health. At 17, I became a certified firefighter, and, at 20, I biked from Texas to Alaska. But last month, at 25, I spent a week in bed recovering from surgery, with fresh incision holes in my abdomen, because I made an unusual choice. I donated my left kidney to someone who dearly needed one — someone whom I don’t know and have never met.

It may have never crossed your mind that you, too, could donate a kidney to someone who is in desperate need. If you are healthy, the risk is quite minimal.

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Editorial: NIMBYs beware: California could make it harder to block homeless and affordable housing

Last fall, state lawmakers passed a narrowly tailored bill that exempted homeless shelters and permanent supportive housing projects in Los Angeles from the California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA, for five years. The bill was designed to make it faster and easier to build much-needed homeless housing and to block Not-In-My-Backyard lawsuits against such projects.

And it worked.

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Op-Ed: No, Republicans aren’t hypocrites. We just don’t see impeachment the way Democrats do

A year ago, it hardly seemed possible that the country could become more polarized. Then came impeachment. Today, it is as if Americans are on two separate ships, facing each other across a harbor with all cannons firing, cheering when an opponent falls overboard.

To Democrats, the Trump presidency is sheer madness. To Trump supporters, that outsider’s “madness” was required to blow up Washington and deliver results.

Impeachment isn’t likely to accomplish much but driving the two sides farther apart.

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Op-Ed: Trump’s tax reform is leaving millions of poor children behind

In 2019, the U.S. spent more than $100 billion on the federal Child Tax Credit. Families that qualify can take up to $2,000 off their taxes for each dependent child, and if the credit is more than the taxes they owe, they get a refund for the balance. The Child Tax Credit is the single largest federal expenditure made to benefit children.

But 23 million children are Read original

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Op-Ed: The UC system needs a tuition hike. Here’s how to make it fair

Californians want education to be affordable. They also want great universities. But with costs rising and tuition basically frozen since 2011, something has to give. The University of California system needs a tuition hike.

The fairest way to do this is through “cohort-based tuition,” a proposal the University of California’s Board of Regents will consider at its Jan. 22 meeting.

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