Category: Wall Street Journal

Mr. President, Don’t Abandon the Dreamers

President Obama did something in 2012 that he previously said he lacked the authority to do. He bypassed Congress and used his executive powers to issue temporary work permits to teenagers and young adults brought to the U.S. illegally as children. President Trump wants to end the program, and the Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a case that could decide its fate.

The government argues that Mr.

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The Tax Increases to Come

The Democratic candidates for President are promising a smorgasbord of new taxes, but why wait until 2021? Last week Maryland Senator Chris Van Hollen and Virginia Congressman Don Beyer unveiled the Millionaires Surtax Act, a plan to soak the top 0.2%.

The bill would put an extra 10% tax on individual income above $1 million, or $2 million for married couples.

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Bloomberg Is Biden’s Best Friend

Michael Bloomberg is not going to be president, but he is a sane liberal with an interesting election strategy—albeit also a strategy likely to turn the White House into ashes in his mouth in the unlikely event he were to win (not that many ambitious people don’t prefer the taste of White House ashes to almost any other favor).

He has the same appeal as several Democratic moderates like Sen. Michael Bennet or former Gov. John Hickenlooper who never exceeded single-digit percentages, but he also has $50 billion.

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Racial Contracts by Force

These days most businesses feel an obligation to promote diversity. But on Wednesday the Supreme Court inComcast v. National Association of African American-Owned Media will consider whether a Reconstruction-era civil-rights law creates a de facto legal obligation to employ and contract with minorities.

This contractual dispute has risen to the High Court because of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals’ novel interpretation of Section 1981 of the 1866 Civil Rights Act.

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The Virginias Move in Opposite Directions

It is a tale of two Virginias—and a microcosm of America’s shifting political landscape.

In 1988 Michael Dukakis lost the national popular vote to George H.W. Bush, 53% to 46%. Bush performed even better in Virginia than he did nationally, taking the Old Dominion by a margin of 60% to 39%. But in West Virginia, the Massachusetts governor—no one’s idea of a populist firebrand—defeated Bush, 52% to 47%.

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