Category: Carlos Lozada

How Americans re-learned to think after World War II

Louis Menand is a chronicler of the American mind, particularly in those moments when America is having second thoughts.

In “The Metaphysical Club” (2001), Menand told the story of the nation in the decades after the Civil War, as it groped for “a set of ideas, and a way of thinking, that would help people cope with the conditions of modern life.

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A call for another Great Migration, this one in reverse

For New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow, however, those suns have gone cold.

The Great Migration of Black Americans from the Jim Crow-era South to the North and West — 6 million people uprooting and remaking their lives over six decades, a mass movement spanning much of the 20th century — was one of the nation’s most defining social and cultural transformations.

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Inside the compulsion to own land — and to keep others out

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The tale begins with Winchester’s own first such experience with possession, when he handed over a cashier’s check during the final days of the 20th century in exchange for 123 and 1/4 acres of “forested and rocky mountainside” in Wassaic, N.Y. “I had just purchased a piece of the United States of America,” he writes with awe, noting that his ancestors had always been tenants, never landowners themselves.

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The most essential books of the Trump era are barely about Trump at all

Just as Trump’s election shocked the country’s political establishment, it jolted America’s intellectual class. Writers, thinkers, activists, academics and journalists have responded as they know best: with lots and lots of books. One of the ironies of our time is that a man who rarely reads has inspired an onslaught of book-length writing about his presidency.

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He investigated Clinton and Trump. Then the Justice Department turned on him.

Strzok spent decades as an FBI agent avoiding the spotlight, diligently combating Russian efforts to penetrate and destabilize the United States, eventually becoming deputy assistant director in the bureau’s counterintelligence division. Yet, with his role in some of the era’s most controversial inquiries — concerning Hillary Clinton’s emails and Moscow’s interference in the 2016 election — that spotlight found him, and Strzok got burned.

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