Tag: Film

The People vs. Richard Jewell

It’s my own fault that I could not, until recently, recall the name of the person who planted a bomb in Atlanta during the 1996 Olympics; it’s also my own fault that I couldn’t say whether that case had been solved. It has: The bomber was Eric Rudolph, and if I ever knew that he had also planted bombs at a lesbian bar and two abortion clinics (I hardly need to spell out his motives), I had forgotten. But I remembered the name Richard Jewell.

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The Heavy-Handed Moralism of Terrence Malick’s New Film

It should be hard nowadays to make art set in Europe just before or during World War II without arousing some suspicion. Too often in such films and books there’s a longing, however concealed, for some prelapsarian moment when right and wrong, good guys and bad, seem to have been helpfully demarcated, and every day provided the opportunity to display one’s mettle.

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The Irishman and Parasite: Two Paths for the Hustle

You have to respect the hustle. No matter what else you might think of Robert De Niro’s Frank Sheeran, the titular anti-hero of Martin Scorsese’s twentieth-century gangster saga The Irishman, you have to admire his rise from lowly truck driver to mob heavyweight. It begins in a steakhouse, with Sheeran boldly making a proposal to Skinny Razor, the wise guy who owns the place. “You like steak?” Sheeran asks.

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Honey Boy Is a Taste of Stardom’s Bitter Reality

People who make movies love to make movies about the people who make movies. I suppose it makes sense; “silver screen” is another way to describe a mirror. Honey Boy is director Alma Har’el’s movie, but people talk about it as Shia LeBeouf’s, not just because he wrote it and stars in it, but because it’s so obviously based on his life that it’s less entertainment than exorcism.

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In The Lighthouse, Beauty Battles the Beast

The first thing you notice about Robert Eggers’s sophomore film, The Lighthouse, is not the way it looks, but the way it sounds. Waves, then a foghorn, then wind—they bleed into one another. There’s a score, too, unsettling and anxious, by Mark Korven, but it’s often hard to discern the music from the noise. This is appropriately destabilizing; The Lighthouse means to rile you.

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