Tag: Racism

Naming the Threat

It’s not hard to completely miss something that exists in plain sight. To see is itself a process of precognition—matching up an anticipated picture of reality to what you observe in real time. If there is no precognition, no placeholder mental picture that deems the matter significant, then perception can be delayed—and indeed, in many cases, entirely denied.

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The New Deal Wasn’t Intrinsically Racist

In recent decades, “racial disparity” has become the central framework for discussing inequities affecting African Americans in the United States. In this usage, disparity refers to the disproportionate statistical representation of some categorically defined populations on average in the distribution of undesirable things—unemployment, low wages, infant mortality, poor education, incarceration, etc.

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The Argument Against D.C. Statehood Is Rooted in Racism

In February of 1873, James Shepherd Pike, a radical Republican journalist and longtime advocate for black suffrage, was assigned by the New York Tribune to cover a Deep South state legislature in the midst of Reconstruction. At the time, governments across the region, thanks to the policies enacted by the federal government, had begun to see an influx of black men among their ranks, and Pike sought to explore the reality of such a swift change of fortune.

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Deporting Harvard Students Was Always the Goal

For Ismail Ajjawi, this should be orientation week. A Palestinian student living in Lebanon, Ajjawi was awarded a scholarship to Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts by AMIDEAST, a nonprofit organization founded in 1951 with the goal of providing cross-cultural and educational opportunities for those in the Middle East, North Africa, and the United States. But Ajjawi isn’t in Cambridge; he’s back in Lebanon.

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The Integration Success Stories

On April 19, 1971, the Senate began debate on legislation that had the potential to foster meaningful integration in American schools. The bill was Connecticut Senator Abraham Ribicoff’s baby. He thought that supposedly haphazard, so-called de facto segregation was a myth. Instead, he believed that all segregation was traceable to law or public policy. It was all “de jure.

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